Guiding decision makers toward a more secure Asia by 2049
 
   
 
 

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Events

 

Upcoming Events

1984 with Chinese Characteristics: How China Rewrites History

Thursday, February 23, 2017
1:30 PM to 4:00 PM
Location: First Floor Conference Center
1777 F St. NW
Washington, DC 20006

A hallmark of General Secretary Xi Jinping’s 'China Dream' is founded on principles of “socialism with Chinese characteristics” with the goal to build a culturally strong and prosperous China under the guidance of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). To achieve the ‘China Dream,’ it is essential for the Party to be a critical part of both China’s past and present to successfully usher China into the future. As such, the CCP has actively dominated the narrative of their history, which has politicized the very nature of the PRC’s struggles and successes. In order to maintain the CCP narrative, the Central Committee of the Chinese Communist Party issued a communiqué in April 2013 known as Document No.9 titled, "Communiqué on the Current State of the Ideological Sphere." The document set out to criticize seven political threats including constitutionalism, civil society, historical nihilism, universal values, and the Western view of media. Overall, the document criticized these elements for attempting to undermine the legitimacy of the Party through the questioning of China’s version of events, and prohibited open discourse or any challenge to the CCP’s historical narrative in an effort to maintain the strict adherence to the Party line.

This conference will bring together an expert panel to address the costs and implications related to the CCP’s distortion of consequential moments in China’s past. Specifically, the event will address “Problems on the Periphery” and the impact of the CCP's involvement in Tibet, Southeast Asia, and Korea. A second panel will discuss how the modern reform era of the 1980’s and onward resulted in a stronger and more defiant CCP today. The conference will also include a discussion on the CCP’s process of “restoration” and the consequences of Party history.

Click here to see event details.

Event:
Opening Remarks: Randall Schriver
Keynote Address: Edward Friedman
Panel One:Miles Yu, Li Jianglin, and Kelley Currie
Moderator: To Be Confirmed
Panel Two: Robert Suettinger and Cao Yaxue
Moderator: Louisa Greve

Past Events

Going Ballistic: The Taiwan Strait Crisis at 20

Tuesday, December 13, 2016
1:30 PM to 4:00 PM
Location: The Conference Center at Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
Root Room
1779 Massachusetts Ave NW
Washington, DC 20036

In June 1995, Taiwan's President, Lee Teng-hui, visited Cornell University to give a speech on democracy. The People's Republic of China (PRC) responded with a series of coercive military actions which precipitated a major crisis in the Taiwan Strait. Beijing viewed the prospect of an internationally recognized Taiwanese democracy as a severe threat to its legitimacy and panned President Lee's visit as a reversal of perceived American commitments to respect its version of the "one China" policy. In the wake of this historic event, the PRC began to rapidly build-up its military capabilities for a future Taiwan conflict scenario. For its part, the U.S. increased strategic dialogues, training exchanges, and arms sales to Taiwan. Now, 20 years after the Crisis, the military and political calculus across the Taiwan Strait has changed. China is far better able to execute military operations across the Strait, but Taiwan is also better prepared to defend itself. Recently, China has abducted Taiwanese citizens abroad, limited Taiwan's participation in international organizations, and conducted threatening military exercises. Given the trend lines before us, it is ever more important to evaluate the 1995-1996 Taiwan Strait Crisis, and explore its implications for the future of the Asia-Pacific.

This conference will bring together a distinguished group of experts for a timely discussion on China’s behavior before, during, and after the Crisis, with a special focus on the Chinese military. Panelists will also examine the ways in which U.S.-Taiwan relations were strengthened after the 1995-1996 Taiwan Strait Crisis, and address some of the outstanding weaknesses which remain.

Click here to see event details.


Event:
Opening Remarks: Randall Schriver
Keynote Address: Abe Denmark
Panel One: Amy Chang, Ian Easton and Shirley Kan
Moderator: Rachael Burton
Panel Two: Carolyn Bartholomew, Tiffany Ma, and Mark Stokes
Moderator: Rupert Hammond-Chambers


Seek Truth From Facts: The Chinese Communist Party's War on History

Tuesday, September 20, 2016
2 PM to 4:15 PM
Location: The National Press Club
The Holeman Lounge
529 14th Street NW, 13th Floor
Washington, DC 20045

The phrase 'Seek Truth from Facts (实事求是) was introduced to the People's Republic of China (PRC) as a hallmark slogan of Mao Zedong and the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). The CCP’s narrative of its history is a critical component of the Party’s domestic and foreign policy, as it aims to legitimize its own power and supremacy. The slogan has been used throughout the PRC's 66-year history, and served as a political tool in Deng Xiaoping’s 1978 speech which allowed the Party to enact much needed reforms while maintaining its authority. The Chinese Communist Party thus utilizes political work groups and education to push its narrative of history to shape and define the discourse on the Party, rule of law, and foreign policy. However, to "Seek Truth from Facts," has tragically resulted in the revision of history, human dignity, and the pursuit of "adherence to the Party."

This conference will bring together an expert panel to identify and assess the impact of the CCP’s war on history at home and abroad by addressing the Sino-Japanese War, the Party's historical claim to Tibet, and confronting the use of history to consolidate national identity and its relevance to the 'rise of China.'

Click here to see event details.


Event:
Panel One: Homare Endo and Xin Haonian
Moderator: Rachael Burton
Panel Two: Rowena He, Helen Raleigh, Michael Davis, and Nadège Rolland
Moderator: Kelley Currie


China as a Responsible Stakeholder? A Decade Later

Tuesday, March 22, 2016
2 PM to 4 PM
Location: The Newseum
Knight Conference Center
Freedom Forum Entrance, 6th Street 555 Pennsylvania Ave NW Washington, DC 20001

In 2005, then-Deputy Secretary of State Robert Zoellick used the term "responsible stakeholder" to address how China should wield its influence in the coming future. In his remarks, he classified the U.S.-China relationship as one that must be built on not only shared interests but shared values. A decade later, how has China contributed positively to the international system and met US expectations as a responsible stakeholder? Going forward, what challenges, changes, and concerns will shape China's developing role in global and regional affairs?

This conference brought together an expert panel to identify and assess areas where China challenges the existing international order and offered recommendations for a U.S. response to reinforce the pre-existing security and economic architecture in the Asia-Pacific.

Click here to see event details.


Event:
Briefing: Evan Feigenbaum
Panelists: Cheng Xiaonong, He Qinglian, John Lee, Oriano Mastro, and Margaret Roberts
Moderator: Rachael Burton
Moderated Discussion: Kathleen Hicks and Ashley Tellis with Randy Schriver


Taiwan's Future Submarine Program: A Deep Dive

Tuesday, December 1, 2015
2 PM to 4 PM
Location: The Conference Center at Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
Root Room
1779 Massachusetts Ave NW Washington DC 20036

The comprehensive transformation of China's military forces has prompted a regional increase in defense development and acquisition to include submarine capabilities. Inherently stealthy, and equipped with a diverse range of sensors and weapon systems, submarines are a "force in being" that have a political effect beyond the military realm. Taiwan's indigenous submarine program would enhance regional stability by providing a credible and survivable deterrent to potential PRC use of force, and enhancing Taiwan's relative position in future cross-Strait political negotiations.

This conference brought together a panel of experts to focus on Taiwan's submarine program in relation to the PLA's force modernization and Taiwan's defense strategy, and identify key policy goals for U.S.-Taiwan relations.

Click here to see event details.


Event:
Briefing: Mark Stokes
Panelists: Jacqueline Newmeyer Deal, Roger Cliff, Eric Sayers
Moderator: Sabrina Tsai
Closing Keynote: Rear Admiral David Yang


Influence Operations: Chinese Political Warfare in East Asia and Beyond

Tuesday, October 6, 2015
2 PM to 5 PM
Location: Heritage Foundation, Allison Auditorium
214 Massachusetts Ave NE Washington, DC 20002

In 2015, China's military modernization efforts and its assertive activities in the East and South China Seas dominate public discourse on China's growing influence. While these developments are usually viewed through a military lens, the People's Liberation Army (PLA)'s activities should be considered and examined as an instrument of statecraft to achieve specific political outcomes as a form of political warfare. Chinese political warfare and influence operations actively target foreign governments, organizations, groups, and individuals to shape their perceptions and behavior. Driven by its political goals, Chinese influence operations are a centerpiece of PRC's overall foreign policy and military strategy.

This conference brought together Dr. Aaron Friedberg and Congressman J. Randy Forbes as keynote speakers as well as a panel of experts to focus on the characteristics of Chinese political warfare and will identify key political goals and tactics in its influence operations towards specific targets in the Asia-Pacific region and beyond.

Click here to see event details.

Event:
Opening Keynote: Dr. Aaron Friedberg
Panelists: Dean Cheng, Liu Shih-chung, Randall Schriver
Moderator: Sabrina Tsai
Closing Keynote: Congressman J. Randy Forbes


China's Military Development and the U.S.-Japan Alliance

Friday, March 30, 2015
9 AM to 2:30 PM
Location: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, Choate Room
1779 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036

The security environment in the Asia Pacific region is evolving quickly. Key among several trends is the accelerating development of the People's Liberation Army's programs and capabilities, which have expanded rapidly over the past two decades. While the People's Republic of China (PRC) insists that its military advancements are peaceful in nature, U.S. allies and partners in the region continue to question Beijing's intentions in light of China's various territorial and historical disputes with its neighbors. As East Asia experiences shifts in the security and political landscape, the U.S.-Japan alliance continues to play a critical role toward maintaining peace and stability in the region.

This conference brought together Japanese scholars and American experts to discuss the PRC's overall military strategy and capabilities, assess its future programs and plans, and discuss the implications for the U.S.-Japan alliance and the region.

Panel 1: Chinese Regional Military Strategy
Panelists: Scott Harold, Chisako Masuo, Dennis Blasko
Moderator: Randy Schriver


Panel 2: Chinese Military Capabilities
Panelists: Tetsuo Kotani, Akira Marusaki, Dean Cheng
Moderator: Mark Stokes


Lunch Keynote: Brigadier General David R. Stilwell
Deputy Director for Politico-Military Affairs for Asia, Joint Staff, the Pentagon


Panel 3: U.S.-Japan Defense Cooperation
Panelists: Sugio Takahashi, Hiroko Maeda, Emma Chanlett-Avery
Moderator: Ian Easton


Recent Testimonies from the Project 2049 Institute

Democratic Transitions in Southeast Asia

November 19, 2015

Project 2049 Institute Senior Fellow testifies before the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations on Burma's democratic transition.

Full testimony


U.S. Economic and Military Alliances in Asia

July 15, 2015

Project 2049 Institute President and CEO testifies before the House Committee on Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific on the U.S.-Japan alliance.

Full testimony


Retreat or Revival: A Status Report on Democracy in Asia

June 11, 2015

Project 2049 Institute Senior Fellow Kelley Currie testifies before the House Committee on Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific on democracy in Asia, highlighting the situation in Burma related to the Rohingya.

Full testimony


China’s Offensive Missile Forces

April 1, 2015

Project 2049 Institute Executive Director Mark Stokes testifies before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission on China's offensive missile forces.

Full testimony


China’s Space and Counterspace Programs

February 18, 2015

Project 2049 Institute Executive Director Mark Stokes testifies before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission on China's space and counterspace programs.

Full testimony


Hong Kong: A Broken Promise?

December 2, 2014

Project 2049 Institute Senior Fellow Kelley Currie testifies before the Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific of the House Committee on Foreign Affairson on Hong Kong's future democratic prospects in light of obstacles from Beijing.

Full testimony


China's Relations with Taiwan and North Korea

June 5, 2014

Project 2049 Institute Research Fellow Ian Easton testifies before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission on cross-Strait military and security issues.

Full testimony


Evaluating U.S. Policy on Taiwan on the 35th Anniversary of the Taiwan Relations Act (TRA)

April 3, 2014

Project 2049 Institute President and CEO Randall Schriver testifies before the Subcommittee on East Asian and Pacific Affairs of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations on US policy on Taiwan on the 35th Anniversary of the Taiwan Relations Act.

Full testimony


China's Military Modernization and its Implications for the United States

January 30, 2014

Project 2049 Institute Executive Director Mark Stokes submits written testimony before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission on China's C4ISR system, computer network operations, and counterspace operations.

Full testimony

 

China’s Nuclear Warhead Inventory: Alternative Approaches for Research and Analysis

March 26, 2012

Project 2049 Institute Executive Director Mark Stokes submits written testimony before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission on China's nuclear warhead inventory.

Full testimony

 

Why Taiwan Matters

June 16, 2011

Project 2049 Institute President and CEO Randall Schriver testifies before the House Committee on Foreign Affairs on why Taiwan matters to the United States.

Full transcript


The Future of Japan

May 24, 2011

Project 2049 Institute President and CEO Randall Schriver testifies before the House Committee on Foreign Affairs' Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific on Japan's long-term disaster recovery and the U.S.-Japan alliance in the context of the changing regional security environment.

Full testimony


The Implications of China’s Military and Civil Space Programs

May 11, 2011

Project 2049 Institute Executive Director Mark Stokes testifies before the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission on the drivers of China's space modernization, military space organizations, and emerging aerospace capabilities.

Full testimony


China's Narratives Regarding National Security Policy

March 10, 2011

Executive Director Mark Stokes testified before the U.S. - China Economic and Security Review Commission on the Chinese government's narratives related to military modernization and the role of the PLA in foreign policy.

Expert Interviews .

Interview with Bob McNally,
Former Senior Director for International Energy on the National Security Council

Interview with Paula Dobriansky,
Former Under Secretary of State for Democracy and Global Affairs

Archived Events

2014  2013  2012  2011  2010  2009  2008 

The Taiwan Policy Review at 20 Years: Assessing the Future of U.S. Taiwan Policy

Thursday, September 25, 2014
10:00 AM to 12:00 PM (noon)
Room 2237, Rayburn House Office Building
45 Independence Ave SW, Washington, DC 20515

In 1994, the Clinton Administration completed a comprehensive interagency review of U.S. policy toward Taiwan, the first of its kind launched by an administration since the U.S. shifted recognition from Taipei to Beijing in 1979. This review resulted in important policy adjustments in line with U.S. national security interests toward Taiwan. As we approach the 20th anniversary of the Taiwan Policy Review (TPR), it is important to assess U.S. policy since the TPR and assess where U.S. policy is heading in the future. Join us for a discussion on the history and significance of the TPR and the future of U.S.-Taiwan relations.

Click here to see event details.


Keynote Speaker and Commentators
Robert Suettinger, Ambassador Winston Lord, and Ambassador Shen Lyushun

Panel:
The Taiwan Policy Review: Context and Future Directions

Taiwan's Sunflower Movement: A New Political Landscape

Friday, June 27, 2014
10:00 AM to 12:30 PM
University of California Washington Center (next to CSIS)
1608 Rhode Island Ave. N.W., Washington, DC 20036

From March 18th through April 10th 2014, several hundred students from universities around Taiwan entered the country's Legislative Yuan, and occupied the main chamber in protest against passage of legislation on a Trade Service Agreement with China. What were the underlying reasons for the protest? What are the implications for Taiwan's domestic politics, with local elections coming up in late 2014 and presidential and legislative elections in early 2016? What are the implications for cross-Strait relations, foreign policy, and regional security? Join us for a discussion on these topics.

Opening Remarks
Panel One: Motivating Factors and Domestic Political Implications

Panel Two:
Implications for Cross-Strait Relations and Regional Security

Japan's Role in a Globalized World: The US-Japan Alliance and Regional Partnerships

Tuesday, March 4, 2014
2:30 - 5:40 PM
Carnegie Endowment Conference Center, Root Room
1779 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20036

Japan faces both opportunities and challenges in the US-Japan alliance and regional and global engagement efforts in 2014. As the capstone event to the two-year program titled, “Japan’s Global Engagement and US-Japan Cooperation” sponsored by the Sasakawa Peace Foundation, the Project 2049 Institute is hosting this roll-out event to highlight and discuss key themes of the program, facilitate greater understanding of Japan's foreign policy, and outline effective recommendations to promote Japan's global and regional engagements.

Opening Remarks
Ambassador Richard Armitage

Panel One:
The US-Japan Alliance: Challenges and Opportunities

Panel Two:
Progress and Obstacles in Japan's Regional Engagement


Beyond Rebalancing: Realizing Security Objectives in the Asia-Pacific Region

Tuesday, Oct 22, 2013
2 - 5:30 PM
Carnegie Endowment Conference Center
1779 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20036

In 2011, President Obama outlined a strategic concept to increase the United States’ attention on the Asia-Pacific region by rebalancing U.S. engagements, activities, and resources toward this vital area of the world. In order for the U.S. and its allies to hedge against potentially destabilizing contingencies in the Asia-Pacific region, the role of security partners should be further examined and better defined. Effective cooperation between Washington and its partners hinges on the political, economic, and technological capital for building partnership capacity. Innovative alternative approaches to ensuring regional security and the development and implementation of a strategic vision for the role of U.S. and security partners are needed to help sustain peace, stability, and prosperity in the Asia-Pacific region.

During this conference, the keynote speaker and panelists addressed innovative alternative approaches to ensuring regional security and developing a strategic vision for the role of U.S. and regional security partners to help sustain peace, stability, and prosperity in the Asia-Pacific region.



Forward Deployed Forces and Asian Security: A Strategic View

September 5-6, 2013

The Guam-US-Asia Security Alliance (GUASA) hosted a two day roundtable in Guam on 5 and 6 September, 2013, entitled, "U.S. Forward Deployed Forces and Asian Security: A Strategic View."

Project 2049 President and CEO Randall G. Schriver participated in this roundtable as an expert participant, among twelve distinguished Asia-Pacific security specialists from mainland US. The roundtable discussions were focused on the "rebalance to Asia" and its implications for Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, and greater Micronesia.

Download the report here.



How to Realize the Asia Rebalance's Rhetoric

Tuesday, June 4, 2013 10:00AM - 11:30AM
Dirksen Senate Office Building
Room G-11

In late 2011, President Barack Obama announced his decision to “rebalance” American foreign policy toward Asia. The President can only achieve his goals for the Asia-Pacific by working with Congress to execute a comprehensive, long-term strategy. In light of this shift in policy, individuals from the Foreign Policy Initiative, American Enterprise Institute, the Project 2049 Institute, and the Long Term Strategy Group have prepared a memo on how the United States can best execute this new policy. Please join representatives from FPI, AEI, and Project 2049 as they discuss the future of securing U.S. interests in the Asia-Pacific.


Security, Alliance, and the Japanese Political Landscape

January 8, 2013

The Project 2049 Institute and the Heritage Foundation co-hosted this event to address the shared interests between the United States and Japan in regional security and stability. The U.S.-Japan alliance is ever more important as North Korea continues to pose threats to the region and China increases its military strength and aggressively presses its own interests. Join us as our distinguished guests explore the impact of Japanese politics on the U.S.-Japan alliance and regional security.

Japanese Perspectives on The U.S.-Japan Alliance: New Opportunities, Rising Tensions, and the Armitage-Nye Report

October 4, 2012
3:30 PM – 5:30 PM
Dirksen Senate Office Building Constitution Avenue and 1st Street, NE Washington, DC 20002 SD-562

Please join us for an expert discussion on the challenges and opportunities ahead for the U.S.-Japan alliance. In August 2012, Ambassador Richard Armitage and Dr. Joseph Nye released the third edition of the Armitage-Nye report U.S.-Japan Alliance: Anchoring Stability in Asia, which offered recommendations for Japan, the U.S., and the alliance spanning energy, security, and the economy. In this follow on discussion, Japanese experts will provide their own perspectives on the feasibility of their recommendations and suggestions for the U.S.-Japan alliance going forward.

Agenda

Event Write-Up


Enhancing Japan-U.S. Partnership in a New Global Order: Insights from Armitage-Nye 2012

August 21, 2012

The Sasakawa Peace Foundation (SPF) hosted Randall G. Schriver, president & CEO of the Project 2049 Institute, for the release of the third edition of a report co-chaired by Richard L. Armitage, President of Armitage International and former Deputy Secretary of State, and Joseph S. Nye, Distinguished Service Professor, Harvard University.


The Armitage-Nye Report: U.S.-Japan Alliance: Anchoring Stability in Asia

August 15, 2012

The Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) Japan Chair cordially hosted the release of a new report co-chaired by Richard L. Armitage, President of Armitage International and former Deputy Secretary of State, and Joseph S. Nye, Distinguished Service Professor, Harvard University.



The Role of North Korea and Taiwan in Korea-China Relations

May 29, 2012

The relationship between South Korea and China has long been influenced by regional third parties. North Korea has traditionally played a central role in shaping Beijing’s behavior toward South Korea and the United States. Over the past four years, Taiwan (ROC) and the People’s Republic of China have seen a significant thaw in their relations, which some argue allows Taipei to wield greater influence over the trilateral relationship between South Korea, China and the United States. While the roles that North Korea and Taiwan play in the trilateral relationship are different, their roles could change the dynamics of the overall relationship.

Please click HERE to read Volume 1 of KEI-Project 2049’s Korea-China Forum newsletter.



Chinese Reactions to Taiwan Arms Sales

April 17, 2012

The Project 2049 Institute and the U.S.-Taiwan Business Council have jointly produced a report – entitled “Chinese Reactions to Taiwan Arms Sales” – that examines the history of major U.S. arms sales to Taiwan since 1979, and discusses the correlation between such arms sales and Chinese reactions and retaliatory responses. The panel discussion will examine the contents and conclusions of the report, and also discuss implications for future U.S. arms sales to Taiwan.

Registration



Burma in the Balance: The Role of Foreign Assistance in Supporting Burma’s Democratic Transition

March 22, 2012

Project 2049 Institute Senior Fellow Kelley Currie discusses the opportunities and challenges of foreign assistance in Burma's democratic transition.


Reviving Japan: Can It Win the Asian Century?

January 4, 2012

Project 2049 Institute President & CEO Randy Schriver moderates panel discussion on Japan's efforts to revive its political and economic systems after 3-11.

Watch event video


Taiwan's Future in the Asian Century: Toward a Strong, Prosperous and Enduring Democracy

November 10, 2011

Project 2049 Institute President & CEO Randy Schriver and Executive Director Mark Stokes discuss Taiwan's role in the Asian century

Watch event video


Is the United States Ready for China's Rise?: Alliances for a New Asia

October 19, 2011

Project 2049 Institute President and CEO Randall Schriver discusses U.S. commitment to Asia and the implications of China's rise.

Watch event video


Taiwan-U.S.-Japan Trilateral Security Dialogue

October 17, 2011

Project 2049 Institute and the Chinese Council for Advanced Policy Studies co-hosted the conference for Taiwan, Japan and the U.S. to exchange views on security issues.


Is America Meeting Taiwan's Self-Defense Needs?

April 27, 2011

Project 2049 Institute President and CEO Randall Schriver discusses U.S. commitment to Taiwan and Taiwan's evolving defense requirements.

Watch event video


Reconsidering America's China Policy: Engaging Party and People

March 17, 2011

Dramatic changes in Sino-American relations have left the longstanding US policy of "engagement" with China outmoded and ineffective. China's economic, political, and military ascension has led to a more assertive and muscular Beijing, complicating American attempts at diplomatic engagement on key issues. Too often, "engaging" China has meant engagement only with the Chinese Communist Party, with modest results on human rights issues to show for the effort.

AEI and the Project 2049 Institute, which seeks to guide decision makers toward a more secure Asia by the century's midpoint, will cohost a conference examining US policy toward China, particularly American engagement of Chinese civil society. With new dynamics shaping Chinese and American interests, the conference will evaluate the prospect of a diplomatic strategy both more effective and better aligned with US interests and values.

Introduction:
Randy Schriver, Project 2049 Institute  

Panel I A Review of Engagement

Carolyn Bartholomew, US-China Economic & Security Commission
Sophie Richardson, Human Rights Watch
Derek Scissors, Heritage Foundation
Mark Stokes, Project 2049 Institute

Moderator: Dan Blumenthal, AEI

Panel II Engaging Civil Society and Reaching the People

Sharon Hom, Human Rights in China 
Ho-Fung Hung, Indiana University
Rebecca Mackinnon, Global Voices
Jennifer Turner, Woodrow Wilson International Center

Moderator: Kelley Currie, Project 2049 Institute

Video and event summary

Strengthening Fragile Partnerships: An Agenda for the Future of U.S.-Central Asia Relations

Feb 17, 2011

A comprehensive new report from the bipartisan Central Asia Study Group and the Project 2049 Institute calls on American and Central Asian leaders to rise to the challenges and opportunities in the region. Strengthening Fragile Partnerships: An Agenda for the Future of U.S.-Central Asia Relations" proposes an action agenda on economics, energy, governance, security, social development, and regional cooperation, and places particular emphasis on the importance of reconnecting Central Asian countries to the global economy.

Study Group chair Richard L. Armitage (former Deputy Secretary of State) and report author Evan A. Feigenbaum (Director, Asia, Eurasia Group, and Adjunct Senior Fellow, Council on Foreign Relations) discuss the report at a media briefing.

(Video courtesy of VOA Uzbek service)


The Implications of Taiwan's Big City Elections

December 1, 2010 (co-hosted with the Heritage Foundation)

Randall Schriver (Project 2049 Institute), Dr. Ho Szu-yin (former Deputy National Security Adviser, Taiwan) and Dr. Lo Chih-cheng (Taiwan Brain Trust) discuss the implications of Taiwan's municipal elections for U.S.-Taiwan and cross-Strait relations.

The 2010 DOD China Report: Defining the Challenge to Taiwan

September 28, 2010

Executive Director Mark Stokes discusses China's military modernization, Beijing's missile posture across the Taiwan Strait and U.S. arms sales to Taiwan.

 

Emerging Aerospace Trends in the Asia-Pacific

Introduction:

Randall Schriver, The Project 2049 Institute | video |

Implications of Aerospace Trends in Asia for the U.S. and the Region

Mark Stokes, The Project 2049 Institute | video: part 1, part 2, part 3, part 4 |
Paul Giarra, Global Strategies & Transformation | video: part 1, part 2, part 3 |
Jim Thomas, Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments | video: part 1, part 2, part 3, part 4 |

Q&A | video: part 1, part 2 |

Keynote Address: Development of China's Air and Space Capability

Dr. Andrew Yang, Deputy Minister of Defense, Taiwan | video: part 1, part 2, part 3 |

Q&A | video: part 1, part 2, part 3, part 4|

Keynote Transcript

Read the Project 2049 Institute's report "Evolving Aerospace Trends in the Asia-Pacific Region: Implications for Stability in the Taiwan Strait and Beyond" by Mark Stokes and Ian Easton.


China’s Emergent Military Aerospace and Commercial Aviation Capabilities

May 20, 2010

Executive Director Mark Stokes testify before the U.S. - China Economic and Security Review Commission.

 

Taiwan-China: Recent Economic, Political, and Military Developments Across the Strait, and Implications for the United States

March 18, 2010

President Randall Schriver and Executive Director Mark Stokes testify before the U.S. - China Economic and Security Review Commission.

Randall Schriver's full statement on political developments

Mark Stokes' full statement on military developments

China 2025

October 19, 2009 (co-hosted with the Council on Foreign Relations)


Panel I: Challenges from Within: Emerging Domestic Trends

Minxin Pei, Claremont McKenna College | video | transcript |
Yanzhong Huang, Seton Hall University | video | transcript |
Kelley Currie, the Project 2049 Institute |video part 1, video part 2 | transcript |
Ole Schell, Director, "Win in China" | video | transcript |
Moderator: John Pomfret, Washington Post

Keynote Remarks: China's Rise: Strategic Implications for Asia

Aaron L. Friedberg, Princeton University | video part 1, video part 2| transcript |
Presider: Simon Tay, Asia Society

Panel II: China Goes Global

Michael A. Levi, Council on Foreign Relations | video | transcript |
Adam Segal, Council on Foreign Relations | video | transcript |
David H. Shinn, George Washington University | video | transcript |
Evan A. Feigenbaum, Council on Foreign Relations |
video part 1, video part 2| transcript |
Moderator: Sheila A. Smith, Council on Foreign Relations

Lunch Keynote: China's Economic Outlook

Stephen S. Roach, Morgan Stanley Asia | video part 1, video part 2, video part 3 | transcript |
Presider: Elizabeth Economy, Council on Foreign Relations

Panel III: China's Security Future

Mark Stokes, the Project 2049 Institute | video | transcript |
James Mulvenon, Center for Intelligence Research and Analysis |
video part 1, video part 2| transcript |
Maryanne Kivlehan-Wise, CNA | video | transcript |

Moderator: Randall Schriver, the Project 2049 Institute

Closing Keynote: the U.S. and China in 2025

Kurt Campbell, Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs | video part 1, video part 2, video part 3 | transcript |
Presider: Randall Schriver, the Project 2049 Institute


US-Taiwan Defense Industry Conference - 2009


September 27-29, 2009

President Randall Schriver and Executive Director Mark Stokes speak at the annual conference hosted by the US-Taiwan Business Council in Charlottesville, Virginia.

 

The U.S. - China Relationshp and the Role of the Strategic and Economic Dialogue

September 10, 2009

President Randall Schriver testifies before the House Foreign Affairs Committee on Asia on the difficulties of striking the right tone in US - China relations.

Full statement

 

Deter, Defend, Repel, and Partner: A Defense Strategy for Taiwan

August 3, 2009

Watch Project 2049 Institute President Randall Schriver and Executive Director Mark Stokes discuss the new Taiwan Policy Working Group report.

 

Exploring the Nature of Uighur Nationalism: Freedom Fighters or Terrorists?

June 16, 2009

President and CEO Randall Schriver testifies before the U.S. House of Representatives Subcommittee on International Organizations, Human Rights and Oversight on the situation of Uighur detainees from Guantanamo Bay.

Full statement

China Since Tiananmen: Power, Party and Society

May 26, 2009

President and CEO Randall Schriver speaks on the Chinese Communist Party at the American Enterprise Institute.

 

U.S. - Taiwan Relations in a New Era: Looking Forward 30 Years After the Taiwan Relations Act

April 22, 2009

President and CEO Randall Schriver speaks on the future of U.S. - Taiwan relations at the Center for Strategic and International studies.

 

The Taiwan Relations Act at 30

April 2, 2009

Remarks and comments:

Senator James Inhofe (event co-host) | Senator Mel Martinez | Senator Sherrod Brown | Raymond F. Burghardt (Chairman, American Institute in Taiwan)

Panel One: The TRA - 1979 - 2009

Randy Schriver | Shirley Kan (Congressional Research Service) | Peter Brookes (The Heritage Foundation) | Dr. Joseph Wu (National Chengchi University)

Panel Two: The TRA - continuing relevance and challenges going forward

Mark Stokes | Dr. Shelley Rigger (Davidson College) | Dr. James Mulvenon (Center for Intelligence Research and Analysis) | Rupert Hammond-Chambers (US-Taiwan Business Council)

Keynote address:

James Kelly (former Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs)

Event Videos

Event Summary

Taiwan's Quadrennial Defense Review and Defense Strategy

April 2, 2009

Executive Director Mark Stokes speaks on the significance of Taiwan's QDR and future defense strategy at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

Capitol Hill Briefing

March 25, 2009

Executive Director Mark Stokes speaks on cross-strait relations and the Chinese military threat to Taiwan at a Capitol Hill briefing.


Human Rights and Rule of Law in China: Where Are We Now and Where Do We Go From Here?


December 12, 2008

President and CEO Randall Schriver serves as panelist for Congressional-Executive Commission on China roundtable on Human Rights and Rule of Law in China.

Official Launch of the Project 2049 Institute

July 31, 2008

The Project 2049 Institute hosts a launch event at the Tabard Inn in Washington D.C. to introduce the only Washington-based think tank that focuses exclusively on future-oriented studies of the Asia Pacific.

China's Military Modernization: Goals and Objective

June 18, 2008

Executive Director Mark Stoke speaks on China's military rise and the future directions of PRC military modernization at the Heritage Foundation.

Taiwan's Elections and What They Mean

March 27, 2008

President and CEO Randall Schriver speaks on the implications of Taiwan's elections for cross-strait and U.S.-Taiwan Relations at the Brookings Institution.

U.S. Policy Toward Taiwan, Time for Change?

March 26, 2008

President and CEO Randall Schriver speaks on the impact of Taiwan's March 22 presidential election at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.



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